Homelessness need not be hopelessness

-Mayor Darrell Steinberg

 
Mayor Darrell Steinberg speaks to a guest at the north Sacramento Triage Shelter

Mayor Darrell Steinberg speaks to a guest at the north Sacramento Triage Shelter

Temporary Railroad Drive shelter moves hundreds to housing

Data from December 2017 to shelter's closing on April 30, 2019. Includes those placed in permanent and longer-term housing.

What is the City doing to get people off the streets?

Since Mayor Darrell Steinberg took office in January 2017, the City has embraced a new approach to addressing homelessness that is producing promising results. Teams of outreach workers and police officers repeatedly contact homeless people — many of whom have resisted help for years — and convince them to enroll in its Pathways program, which connects them with health care, removes barriers such as missing Social Security cards and helps them find permanent shelter.

From December 2017 to the end of April 2019, the city served more than 650 of these people in its Railroad Drive shelter, which employed the “low-barrier triage” approach now considered by experts to be the best way to get large numbers of people off the streets and into housing quickly. More than 264 people transitioned to permanent or longer-term housing after a stay at the Railroad Drive shelter. That represents 40 percent of the people who passed through Railroad, compared with 21 percent of Sacramento County’s traditional shelter occupants who transitioned to permanent housing in 2018.

Railroad Drive was always intended to be temporary and operated out of a retrofitted warehouse. Now Mayor Steinberg and his Council colleagues are working to greatly expand the number of shelter beds in Sacramento to 800 citywide, with about 100 in each Council district.

Mayor Steinberg has raised millions of private dollars to help expand shelter capacity in Sacramento and secured $20 million in additional funds for the City and County as part of the 2018 state budget process. As the head of the California Big City Mayors group, he has played a key role in lobbying for more state resources to address the state’s most significant public health, safety and humanitarian crisis. Gov. Gavin Newsom has included $1 billion to address homelessness in proposed 2019-20 budget, $650 million of which would go directly to local governments.

 
I refuse to continue to preside over modest success, because we’re better than that. We’ve helped hundreds; now it’s time to help thousands
— Mayor Darrell Steinberg
Ramona Jasper and Anthony Moss were living in a homeless camp in north Sacramento when they entered the City’s Triage Shelter and enrolled in its Pathways program. From there, they moved into their own house in south Sacramento. It was the first time in 25 years that Jasper had not been homeless.

Ramona Jasper and Anthony Moss were living in a homeless camp in north Sacramento when they entered the City’s Triage Shelter and enrolled in its Pathways program. From there, they moved into their own house in south Sacramento. It was the first time in 25 years that Jasper had not been homeless.

I’m happy. I can cook, I can clean. I can take care of my dogs. I’m going after a life now.
— Ramona Jasper
 
Image courtesy of streetsteam.org

Image courtesy of streetsteam.org

What is the City doing about the trash left by homeless campers?

The City has hired the Downtown Streets Team to clean up in neighborhoods affected by homeless camping. The Streets Team employs homeless volunteers and helps connect them with housing and jobs.

Sacramento Homeless World Cup

What can I do to help?

You can help address the issue of homelessness in Sacramento by volunteering through a variety of non-profits and faith groups that provide services and shelter. In January 2019, you will have a unique opportunity to learn more about people who are homeless in our community and make sure we get adequate state and federal funding by participating in the Homeless Point in Time census of the homeless population in Sacramento County.

 

Read more about the City’s efforts in these recent blog posts

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What is the City doing to mitigate the effects of homelessness?

 

The City has hired the Downtown Streets Team to clean up in neighborhoods affected by homeless camping. The Streets Team employs homeless volunteers and helps connect them with housing and jobs. The Downtown Streets Team currently focuses on the area around the City’s Triage Shelter in north Sacramento, but it will expand to downtown and the River District when the City receives $5.6 million in new state funding under the new state’s new Homeless Emergency Aid Program.

In November, the City Council also approved a $400,000 package of additional mitigation measures, including a new disposal truck and a trash collection crew that will be dedicated to cleaning up after homeless camps.

If you see a homeless person being victimized or committing a crime, call 911. Within the Sacramento City limits, you can report homeless camps by calling the City’s 311 Service Center or submitting an online request through the website or the 311 app.

What can I do to help?

Image courtesy of Sacramento Steps Forward

Image courtesy of Sacramento Steps Forward


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